Divorce FAQs

The Middlesex County law firm of Brause, Brause & Ventrice, L.L.C. has extensive experience advising clients throughout New Jersey on all the legal aspects of divorce in our state. The following are brief answers to some of the many questions about the divorce process that are often heard by the attorneys in our Middlesex County divorce practice. For more detailed answers to these and other questions about divorce and family law, contact our Middlesex County divorce law firm.

Our divorce lawyers take pride in their New Jersey roots, serving Middlesex County and various communities throughout New Jersey. For a free initial consultation, call 732-767-0044 to speak with a Middlesex County divorce attorney at Brause, Brause & Ventrice, L.L.C. or email our office today.

Will I have the opportunity to try to resolve my divorce without a formal trial?

You may engage in what is referred to as alternative dispute resolution to try to reach a settlement at any time before either of you files for divorce, and even while your divorce is pending. The attorneys at Brause, Brause & Ventrice, L.L.C. encourage our clients to reach an amicable and expeditious resolution of all issues in their divorce through negotiations, mediation, arbitration, and settlement conferences. In fact, there are stages in the proceedings in which the court will require the parties to try to resolve their cases through mediation. This is an effective way to limit your legal fees so that you may get a fresh start and move on with your lives after your divorce.

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How long will it take for me to get a divorce?

Divorce proceedings range in durations throughout the State of New Jersey. In Middlesex County, it is common for a divorce case to take somewhere between six months and a year from the time that you file your divorce complaint before it will be concluded. The attorneys at Brause, Brause & Ventrice, L.L.C., recognize your desire and need to expedite this process so that you may move on with your life, and we make every effort to work towards a prompt conclusion.

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Will I have to prove that our marital problems are the fault of my spouse?

Marital fault has almost no legal significance in the State of New Jersey. For this reason, the large majority of divorces are filed based upon grounds of irreconcilable differences, rather than grounds based upon the fault of one of the parties. The relatively few exceptions may involve cases in which one spouse was subjected to severe abuse during the marriage and where one spouse engaged in some criminal conduct to the detriment of the other spouse.

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